annoy


annoy
01. It really [annoys] me when you change the television channel every five minutes.
02. That buzzing sound from the refrigerator is really [annoying].
03. The noise of the lawnmower was an [annoyance] that kept me from being able to really concentrate on my homework.
04. Someone once joked that you should never try to teach a pig to sing. It wastes your time, and [annoys] the pig.
05. Your snoring is more than just an [annoyance]; it's a serious problem, and I think you should see a doctor about it.
06. The Prime Minister was [annoyed] with his Cabinet for revealing details of their discussions to the press.
07. The [annoying] thing about Stephanie's superior attitude is that she is usually right.
08. Children, it really [annoys] your mother if you keep pulling on her sweater while she is trying to make supper.
09. There is a French proverb which says that good advice is often [annoying], bad advice never.
10. Robert Penn Warren once said that the urge to write poetry is like having an itch. When the itch becomes [annoying] enough, you scratch it
11. Whenever my girlfriend gets [annoyed] about something she just sits there, and refuses to say anything.
12. Someone once joked that if anything lucky happens to you, don't forget to tell your friends in order to [annoy] them.
13. The children were [annoyingly] loud during the movie, so I couldn't always hear what was being said.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Annoy — An*noy ([a^]n*noi ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Annoyed} ([a^]n*noid ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Annoying}.] [OE. anoien, anuien, OF. anoier, anuier, F. ennuyer, fr. OF. anoi, anui, enui, annoyance, vexation, F. ennui. See {Annoy}, n.] To disturb or irritate,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • annoy — vb 1 Annoy, vex, irk, bother mean to disturb and nervously upset a person. Annoy stresses loss of equanimity or patience as a result of being forced to endure something that one finds obnoxious or offensive or sometimes merely displeasing or… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Annoy — An*noy , n. [OE. anoi, anui, OF. anoi, anui, enui, fr. L. in odio hatred (esse alicui in odio, Cic.). See {Ennui}, {Odium}, {Noisome}, {Noy}.] A feeling of discomfort or vexation caused by what one dislikes; also, whatever causes such a feeling;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • annoy — [ə noi′] vt. [ME anoien < OFr anoier < VL inodiare < in odio habere (or esse), to have (or be) in hate: see ODIUM] 1. to irritate, bother, or make somewhat angry, as by a repeated action, noise, etc. 2. to harm by repeated attacks;… …   English World dictionary

  • annoy — I verb acerbate, affront, aggravate, badger, bedevil, bother, chafe, cross, discommode, discompose, displease, disquiet, distress, disturb, enrage, exasperate, fester, fret, gall, get on the nerves of, grate, grieve, harass, harm, harry, heckle,… …   Law dictionary

  • annoy — (v.) late 13c., from Anglo Fr. anuier, O.Fr. enoiier, anuier to weary, vex, anger; be troublesome or irksome to, from L.L. inodiare make loathsome, from L. (esse) in odio (it is to me) hateful, ablative of odium hatred (see ODIUM (Cf. odium)).… …   Etymology dictionary

  • annoy — [v] irritate, upset abrade, agitate, ask for it*, badger, be at*, bedevil, beleaguer, be on the back of*, bore, bother, break, bug, burn up, chafe, displease, distress, disturb, egg on*, exasperate, fire up*, gall, get, gnaw, harass, harry, heat… …   New thesaurus

  • annoy — ► VERB 1) make slightly angry. 2) pester or harass. 3) archaic harm or attack repeatedly. DERIVATIVES annoyance noun annoyed adjective annoying adjective. ORIGIN Old French anoier, from Latin …   English terms dictionary

  • annoy — verb ADVERB ▪ intensely, really ▪ His air of calm superiority annoyed her intensely. ▪ It really annoys me when people forget to say thank you. VERB + ANNOY ▪ be beginning to …   Collocations dictionary

  • annoy — 1. verb a) To disturb or irritate, especially by continued or repeated acts; to bother with unpleasant deeds. Marc loved his sister, but when she annoyed him he wanted to switch her off. b) To do something to upset or anger someone; to be… …   Wiktionary

  • annoy — verb Etymology: Middle English anoien, from Anglo French anuier, ennoier, from Late Latin inodiare to make loathsome, from Latin in + odium hatred more at odium Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to disturb or …   New Collegiate Dictionary